Surface

Matera was an interesting place because the topography gave shape to the city and architecture. The color of the homes blended with the landscape and it went along with the landscape. Another thing that I found interesting was how the houses were built along the edge of the cliffs.

Roger Roblero

Analysis-Malta

As Architect Richard England said, " the building become a narrative. You don’t copy the Arch but enhance it"
I had the privileged to analyze one of Richard England building on our travel to Malta in Manikata. The church is a narrative of the history of the town. Richard England wanted to build a church of its place and of it’s time. My analysis is an understanding of the church in connection to the megalithic remains.

Belinda Christie Silverne

Analysis

Alberobello, Puglia

The limestone trullo dwellings in Alberobello are characterized by a style of corbeling of dry-stone. It is remarkable that these dwellings were built with the intent of temporary peasant housing that can be quickly deconstructed, yet they still remain today. The trulli are a very unique form of modular ancient architecture.

Jacqueline Ras

Urban

Matera

I really enjoyed the hectic stacking of buildings in Matera that nicely compliment the contrasting topography of hills and valleys. This elevation and section show this. I also found an article online that discusses the evolution of the city from an ancient civilization to a slum to a destination point.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/17/matera-italy-culture-capital-cave-homes-from-squalor-to-airbnb-film-sets

Jacqueline Ras

Jacqueline Ras

Analysis

Manikata Church
Malta, Richard England

I was interested in various aspects of the church. The splitting of the ellipse into two halves, followed by the shifting on the ‘y’ axis creates interesting moments of entry and exit that slips in between the two curved walls. I was also very intrigued that many of the details, such as the mullions and the pews, followed the concept and really formed a complete design throughout. The modern elements of the bare cross, open confessionals and low-rise altar are also very significant elements.

Jacqueline Ras

Urban

I really enjoyed the city of Ostuni with its confusing white-washed alleyways, staircases and arches. I wanted to know more about its history, so I checked online and found that Ostuni is known as ‘La Città Bianca’ in Italy. The city has been occupied since the Stone Age, but most of what we see was built during the Medieval Period. There was no plan for the design of the city, so that is why there are buildings stacked on top of each other and arched alleyways to support the walls. I found that the houses infected with the plague were required to paint their walls with a limestone/water mixture that made them white. Today, the city encourages residents to repaint their walls every two years and even pays them half the cost in order to maintain this appearance.

Jacqueline Ras

Analysis

Manikata Church
Richard England

Program pieces are the same geometry just at a different scale.

I felt the plan was interesting in that each curve that offsets its path continues and point to a view. These moments create new experiences that forces the viewer into a certain direction.

Richard England said, he felt architecture was something that moved people to somewhere else , that it should have specific views that led a persons eye. Something that pointed to another significant moment.

In this case the external path points to the bell tower.

Rachel Spampinato

Analysis – Assemblies

Alberobello’s traditional town home assembly.

– Starting with the floor plan the walls are stacked and connections are made between rooms.

– They begin structure for door openings (arches)

– Walls begin to curve in and become the ceiling that supports the rooflike dome.

The largest roof dome indicated the living area and other rooms connect only to this central room.

Rachel Spampinato

Analysis

Alberobello

Trulli which is the name derives from the Greek word for dome, and refers to the ancient stone used for these houses. These limestone dwellings found in the southern region of Puglia, are remarkable examples of mortar less construction, which is a prehistory building technique. The whole town including the church has this very unique dome style.

Ana Maria Ramirez

Urban

Sassi Di Matera: This carved out town made me realize how important nature is in architecture. Without nature architecture is not attainable. Through it we can find the connection to art that brings about the architecture. These carving brings out many different levels in the mountain, leaving you in a labyrinth of carved out dwellings. I was also able to see how man-made structure and nature were combined.

Ana Maria Ramirez

Miscellaneous

Flavors – Martina Franca Apulia
The Apulian cuisine has its strong point in local products. Its simplicity and genuineness its based on five fundamental ingredients: farinaceous products, olive oil, fresh and dry vegetables, mutton and fish (Shell Fish). I tried this same dish (risotto frutti di mare) in other places but the one in Garibaldi Bistrot Ristorante was far the best.

Karina Pena

Urban

Lecce, The Roman Amphitheater
Hidden Treasures.
Natural bridge to the east and far away civilizations. Lecce has a particular way to present the history of a town with its magnificent architecture. One example its the Roman amphitheater by the Piazza Sant’ Oronzo.
Karina Pena

Analysis

I made an analysis study of Castel Del Monte (octagonal shape) in Apulia, Bari where I analyzed the different openings in the building. Each door entrance is different and is made of different materials including lime stone and marble.My analysis focus on shadows and light, how light get into the building and how a scale figure affect the space.

Belinda Christie Silverne

50 AUTHORS – RECOMMENDED READING LIST RICHARD ENGLAND

 

50 AUTHORS – RECOMMENDED READING LIST

RICHARD ENGLAND

 

AUTHOR BOOK
Abbott Edwin A. Flatland
Adams Douglas The hitchhikers guide to the galaxy
Alexander Christopher The timeless way of building
Ambasz Emilio The poetics of the pragmatic
Ambasz Emilio The architecture of Luis Barragan
Ambasz Emilio Fragments for a credo
Ayrton Michael The maze maker
Bach Richard Jonathan Livingstone Seagull
Barnes Julian A history of the world in ten and a half chapters
Borges Jorge Luis Labyrinths
Borges Jorge Luis Short stories
Calvino Italo Invisible cities
Calvino Italo Six memos for the new millennium
Calvino Italo If on a winters night a traveller
Canetti Elias The human province
Chatwin Bruce The song lines
Day Christopher Places of the soul
de Saint Exupery Antoine The little prince
Eco Umberto How to travel with a salmon
Eco Umberto Misreadings
Eliade Mircea The sacred and the profane
Galeano Eduardo Mirrors
Garcia Marquez Gabriel One hundred years of solitude
Hammarskjold Dag Markings
Hejduk John Sanctuaries
Hejduk John Lines no fire could burn
Justen Norton The phantom tollbooth
Kafka Franz The metamorphosis
Kaufman Bob Golden sardine
Kaufman Bob Solitudes crowded with loneliness
Kepes Gyorgy The language of vision
Knevitt Charles Perspectives
Kostof Spiro The architect
Kundera Milan The unbearable lightness of being
Maitland Sara A book of silence
Mishima Yukio Sun and steel
Moore Charles + Bloomer Kent Body, Memory & Architecture
Moore Charles + Lyndon Donlyn Chambers for a memory palace
Morrish William Rees Civilizing terrains
Neruda Pablo The heights of Macchu Picchu
Nin Anais Ladders of fire
Nin Anais House of incest
O’Donohue John Anam Cara
O’Donohue John Divine Beauty
Okri Ben Astonishing the Gods
Okri Ben In arcadia
Okri Ben A time for new dreams
Pallasmaa Juhani Encounters
Pallasmaa Juhani The eyes of the skin
Pallasmaa Juhani The thinking hand
Ponti Gio In praise of architecture
Porter Tom Archispeak
Prather Hugh I touch the earth
Prather Hugh Notes to myself
Prevert Jacques Collected poems
Quantrill Malcolm Ritual and response
Quantrill Malcolm The environmental memory
Rand Ayn The fountainhead
Rasmussen Steen Experiencing architecture
Roszak Theodore Where the wasteland ends
Rudofsky Bernard Architecture without architects
Shah Idris The exploits of the incomparable Mulla Nasrudin
Tanizaki Junichiro In praise of shadows
Twain Mark The story of Adam and Eve
Unwin Simon Architecture notebooks
Valery Paul Eupalinos
Wurman Richard Saul What will be will always be (Louis Kahn)
Youcenar Marguerite Memoirs of Hadrian
Youcenar Marguerite A coin in nine hands

 

Certosa e Museo di San Martino, Naples

2017-06-13 10.47.04.jpg

Presbyterian Section

The National Museum of San Martino is the main Italian public collection dedicated to the ‘Neapolitan crib’, a typical production that has reached the highest quality peaks between Seventeenth and Nineteenth Centuries. The presepi section, located in the area where the Certosa’s kitchens were, revolves around the magnificent Cuciniello crib, set in a fake cave, and equipped with a lighting system that simulates the alternation of dawn, full day, sunset and night . The crib is named after Michele Cuciniello, the collector who donated to the State his collection of about eight hundred “shepherds”, animals and accessories, and who personally wanted to follow the staging and assembling of the entire crib, inaugurated in 1879.

Along with this composition, which is linked to the fame of the museum mainly abroad, have been added over the years other nuclei, among which we recall at least the Ricciardi crib, with a magnificent procession of Orientals. Extraordinary is the legacy of lawyer Pasquale Perrone who in 1971 entrusted to the San Martino Museum its collection of 956 high-quality items, some mounted and still enclosed in the display features “scarabattoli” with the typical Nativity scenes, The Osteria and the Annunciation to Pastors. Some showcases are devoted in particular to animal figures, extraordinary realism, and to the many “still life” of plants, edible items and various supplements, perfect reproductions of miniature real objects.

At the completion of the Section, recently, in the same environments were placed the testimonies of pre-Columbian figures dating back to the most famous eighteenth-century production, which show the evolution of the art of “making the crib”, with unique pieces such as the 14th century Virgin puerpera in Wood or the surviving figures of the magnificent crib already in the Church of San Giovanni in Carbonara, a 15th century work by the sculptors Pietro and Giovanni Alamanno.

 

Idea

Some of the works discussed in the garden and around Malta with Richard England.

Books
Borges – Labyrinths / Garden of Forking Paths
Calvino – Under the Jaguar Sun / Invisible Cities
John Lobel – Between Silence and Light
Ben Okri – Astonishing the Gods

Films
Metropolis- Fritz Lang
L’Aventura – Antonioni
La Strada – Federico Fellini
My Architect (Louis Kahn)

Music
Leonard Cohen
Maria Callas
Any great Tenor (start with Caruso, Pavarotti, Carraras perhaps)
(For some contemporary Italian music – Vinicio Capossela)

Architecture 

Louis Barragon
Jorn Utzon
John Hejduk
James Sterling
Carlo Scarpa

Architecture – Certain (other than the masters)

Glen Murcutt
Tadao Ando
Renzo Piano
Peter Zumthor

Architecture – Uncertain (yet certainly worthy of our conversations)

Zaha Hadid
Santiago Calatrava
Daniel Libeskind

 

Idea

Looking at a meditation space some by Richard England has given me new thoughts on how to use water to create a powerful effect on a space. Soothing sounds and muted colors can transform a space situated in a commercial development into its own world.

William Caple

Idea

This past weekend in Malta was be one of my highlights of this trip. Being able to see how this country was formed, specifically Valletta and Mdena was very interesting and meeting Richard England was the icing on the cake. The building I connected to the most was the Manikata church. This church was totally different from what I have seen for the past couple of weeks and it was truly refreshing. Richard England has such a great passion for sacred spaces and this specific church made me look at religious spaces in a totally different way. Seeing and experiencing this space reignited my passion for sacred spaces and inspired me to design them in the future.

The ultimate task of the architect is to make the ordinary, extraordinary.

-Richard England

Ana Maria Ramirez

Surface

Look up! The ceiling design of older buildings have tended to be decorated with painting and trim to break them up and create interest from the viewer. In a modern building such as a café I saw created interest by using form and shape to accentuate part of the ceiling.

William Caple

Analysis

Cathédrale Saint-Conrad
Molfetta, Italy

Analysis drawings of the cathedral in Molfetta, showing the sequence of the three domes that are capped with the forms of the three different geometries, square, octagon and hexagon. The forms are visible from the exterior and stand apart from the two tall towers that stand at the rear of the church. It is interesting how from the front elevation you aren’t able to see all of the geometries and then as you move to the side of the cathedral, they reveal themselves.

Jacqueline Ras

Analysis

Cathédrale Saint-Conrad
Molfetta, Italy

Analysis drawings of the cathedral in Molfetta, showing the sequence of the three domes that are capped with the forms of the three different geometries, square, octagon and hexagon. The forms are visible from the exterior and stand apart from the two tall towers that stand at the rear of the church. It is interesting how from the front elevation you aren’t able to see all of the geometries and then as you move to the side of the cathedral, they reveal themselves.

Jacqueline Ras

Miscellaneous

Image of the typical enclosed, timber balconies in Malta. A website states that this style of balcony became popular in the mid-eighteenth century and derive from North-African and Arabic prototypes. The typical Maltese timber balcony is characterized by four windows on the front and one on either side. They were typically painted green or beige, but are now painted a variety of colors. The balconies served different functions, including a means of socialization.

Jacqueline Ras

Miscellaneous

Image of the typical enclosed, timber balconies in Malta. A website states that this style of balcony became popular in the mid-eighteenth century and derive from North-African and Arabic prototypes. The typical Maltese timber balcony is characterized by four windows on the front and one on either side. They were typically painted green or beige, but are now painted a variety of colors. The balconies served different functions, including a means of socialization.

Jacqueline Ras

Urban

I found an article about this Calatrava bridge we we saw the other day. The bridge is the North-South Axis Bridge in Bari that was completed in September 2016. It is one of the longest bridges in Southern Italy, positioned between rail tracks. The bridge is characterized by a large pylon that connects to steel structural cables.

The bridge is unique because of this one central pylon tower that supports such a long span, compared to many of his other bridges that use two or more for similar spans.

Here’s the link to the article. It is in Italian, but there are close-up images:
https://building.closeupengineering.it/ponte-sospeso-dellasse-nord-sud-bari/9299/

Jacqueline Ras

Idea

Richard England main idea was to design a church for the community and church. We can see his idea in this entrance piece. The cross is surrounded by local stones, found in the surrounding context. Then the cross and the stone are surrounded by a frame, which unites them. Each item is sepearted by a gap but are still united by the frame. For me this entrance piece has a powerful message.

-Alexis Roblero

Threshold

Surface & Structure
(Manikata Church)

Richard England separates plane/surface from point/Structure to emphasize a threshold at the entrance and at the alter.

Entrance:
It creates a space for preparation and prayer.

Alter:
Emphasizes certain elements of prayer.
(Baptismal, holy items, alter, cross)
The surface breaks apart and seems to be sliding from the structure above.

Matthew Kevin Acer

Surface

Confessional Prototype
(Manikata Church)

Richard England’s play on layering of surfaces brings you from the relief work of the bearing of the cross into a confessional. The addition of this layer (white) seems representative of divinity. (Dying for sins to relieving yours) Additionally, the form of the confession is a break from the type that precedent would give. It is no longer an added object in the naive of the church, or a singular act in private. It seems the priest would sit in the middle and each sinner would speak into each ear. Does it work?
Still an interesting experiment.

Matthew Kevin Acer

Miscellaneous

Buca Mario, located in Florence in a wall/basement. I would have never gone to this place without a recommendation from Rachel; if you’re tall you barely fit through the entry way.
Our server spoke English so we started on a good note, he gave us a wine recommendation. This was easily the best wine I’ve had on the trip so far. Sweet red will always be better than dry red in my book, but this was the perfect hybrid of the two.
Dish 1 was a prosciutto stuffed tortellini with some sort of cheese, or simply heaven in mouth. The cheese was clearly just sliced and put right on top, and it went hand in hand with the prosciutto.
Dish 2 was beyond any expectation, It was just a balsamic steak with mashed potatoes. I haven’t ordered steak all trip and will continue to do so, but this was some of the best steak I’ve ever had. The balsamic, according to our server, was the chefs own blend of spices with balsamic that can only be found at their restaurant here. I can see why, it was masterful.
Overall the dinner was an 8.5/10 the food was absolutely incredible, but pricey. Since then there has only been 1 meal that has taken the crown from it, and it was half the price in Malta.

Stephen Fish

Analysis

Renzo Piano’s Stadium in Bari is a very interesting building. It is not the typical stadium where the circulation wraps around. The circulation is very direct and it serves a section at a time. In addition, the section is very interesting. It becomes part of the landscape rather than an object on the ground.

Roger Roblero

Surface

I like how Richard England, rather than designing a church in the traditional style being built in Malta at that time, he chose a different style for this church. He designed it reflecting the local character and culture of the surrounding community. The church surface fits the site. This church was truly designed to respect the site, rather than being another monument on top of a hill.

-Alexis Roblero

Surface

 

The facade of the parliament building contains those carefully carved stone blocks of limestone. They provide a calculated shading element to the Windows, but take a form that’s strangely similar to the city sky line.
The sky line appears as a series of also carved stones, which are also the main building material in Malta.
Renzo takes the elevation condition and applies it on the facade and it appears in plan.

Stephen Fish

Urban

Malta’s urban characteristics were strongly influenced by baroque architecture and the city has continued stay consistent since the 17th century; when the city began to develop.

Lapparelli, an architect sent to Malta in the late 16th century proposed a grid that followed Malta’s topography and landscape. But it was rejected and replaced with a standard grid.
The grid that fell on the hills created slopes streets where water was the lowest point, and political and monumental buildings held the highest.
Streets become pedestrian stairs that frame the view to the water and create moments for sitting along restaurants and cafeterias.

Rachel S.

> On Jun 22, 2017, at 12:39 PM, Rachel Spampinato wrote: >
> Stadio San Nicola
> Renzo Piano succeeds in creating a stadium that offers inclusive moments to people outside the stadium through openings above circulation. These openings break up the seating areas and allows site lines out into the urban scenery of Bari. The main circulation is also successful because it’s can handle the need to egress large crowds after the end of a game . >
> Rachel S.

>> Analysis

>> This cathedrals Dome is different in that it’s transition from square transept to a octagonal support system for the circle dome above. Side arches have a different shape between them which is the major transition piece before the octagon. >>
>> Rachel S.

Analysis

Structure is entirely void, but the spaces are strangely intimate at each landing. Acts a a structural piece for what was really only 2 rooms per floor, and it frames no frontal rooms.
The only view actually provided is the courtyard, and whatever is behind the stairwell which varies.
Comparatively it’s the equivalent of some courtyards in piazzas, where there is an open second level floor plan that looks down below.
Even acting as an almost transparent layer between the courtyard and the exterior space of the residents, so that the user won’t feel completely enclosed.

Stephen Fish

Ideas

If only I were a statue…
Hadrian’s Villa, Tivoli reminded me of the classical elements in Architecture. The idea of movement express on the standing statues and the elegance that it displays gave me the impression of moving forms creating a focus around the object which become the focal point. The remaining ruins of some of the buildings create this shape, and form a pattern that gives me the idea Of creating a new form within the building. A new form
Of Architecture can certainly emerged.

Belinda Christie Silverne

Analysis

Stadio San Nicola
Renzo Piano succeeds in creating a stadium that offers inclusive moments to people outside the stadium through openings above circulation. These openings break up the seating areas and allows site lines out into the urban scenery of Bari. The main circulation is also successful because it’s can handle the need to egress large crowds after the end of a game .

Rachel S.

Surface

The Stadio San Nicola is a stadium designed by Renzo Piano in 1990 for the World Cup in Bari. From my prospective, this stadium is a structural flower that emerged from the surface. Each circular curve is a technique to allow shades for the sittings and there is a gap between each curve.it is a clear system of sitting and you can see the transparency through this steel frame structure.

Belinda Christie Silverne

Relfection

I’ve noticed throughout the trip the dimension of clear space between buildings. In places such as the first photo where both sides of the street are planed there is plenty of space for light and air to get to the lower levels. On the contrary spaces that building owners were allowed to build with out restriction there are many close structures and narrow passageways.

William Caple

Reflections – Naples

Part IV.

Final thoughts

Is this description still accurate today?

It depends who is viewing.

A tourist comes and hides behind a barrier, a traveler comes and sees the surface. Is this just a spectator sport? Maybe it is the illusion of inclusion that is displayed in the public realm. Only the resident can really experience the porous quality of life today. Should we even impede?

0

Matthew Kevin Acer

Piazza Santo Annunziata

Analysis
This piazza is the model for respect between architects.
In different time periods architects plan to achieve a certain function without differenciating the street plain and the relationship each building will have with the piazza, the people, and each other. The scale and characteristics of the piazza has a certain continuity that enhances the feeling in the space and brings equality to the importance buildings in the space. (Church-Orphanage-Political)

Rachel S.

Miscellaneous

I’ve noticed that one of the thing Naples is passionated about is soccer. As we walked around Naples throught the five days we were their, I ran into Maradona paintings, soulveniers, and jerseys several time. Maradona has won two league title with Napoli, which are their only two in history of their club. The funny thing is that he played their from 1984-1991. He is not even a native from Naples or Italy, but this shows us how passionated the people from Naples are.

Alexis Roblero